Greenfield Daily Reporter: Chambers shares education plan to implement if elected

By Lacey Watt
Greenfield Daily Reporter

INDIANAPOLIS — Ahead of the primaries in May, gubernatorial candidate Brad Chambers released his education plan, which shares policies he would want to bring to the legislature to help students and teachers across the state.

Chambers said that after releasing his education plan called “Learn More, Earn More” just shy of two weeks ago, it has generally been well received and “fundamental to Hoosier quality of life.”

Chambers also said that education is fundamental to his focus of being able to grow the state’s economy.

“There’s a lot of importance placed on improving our education, and so having a thorough education plan is really part and parcel of being governor,” Chambers said.

While Senators and Representatives are currently working with the legislature on reading skills, Chambers also wants to ensure that all students should be able to pass IREAD3 before moving forward to the fourth grade. Chambers said that, historically, too many students have been waved on and don’t read well.

Chambers said that it may be a tough conversation to have with parents to consider their kids to be held back, but the long-run outlook is worse than being held behind one year.

With that, Chambers believes that — generally speaking — the educational system needs to be more individualized for the students. Chambers said that with modern society changing, the economy, and industry evolving, the education system needs to do the same and they can’t rely on “a 100-year-old system to really support prosperity for the future.”

Another policy Chambers wants to focus on that officials work on at the state level is providing opportunities for career development and awareness, like HEA 1002.

Chambers said that there are many fiscal opportunities for someone to build a great life in Indiana after high school, but those pathways need to be made more clear for students.

“I think it’s incumbent on Indiana’s educational system to really start articulating, outlining and educating kids in seventh grade really what those options are,” Chambers said.

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